CP307 Process Engineering Project Jan–May 2012

Core Course for the C&P Engineering Undergraduates

 

updated on March 13, 2012

 

intended learning outcomes

 

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course description

assessment scheme

timeline

 

a very useful site for tips for the C&P Eng practice: http://www.cheresources.com/

currently executed (or suggested) project topics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMPORTANT NOTICE

2nd assessment will be held on 19 March 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

-        Ability to formulate and solve technical problems

-        Ability to self-acquire new knowledge and skills

-        Effective management of time and efficient use of available resources

-        Ability to search and extract information from different sources and apply

-        Ability to use appropriate mathematical and other tools and techniques, equipment, and pertinent software and appropriate programming language

-        Ability to use laboratory and workshop equipment to generate valuable data, to perform tests, and to test a design data

-        Ability to participate in scientific and technical communications effectively with confidence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Description:

Course objectives:

-   Development of enquiring mind and eager for new knowledge

-   Working experience in open-ended problems/projects

-   Awareness of the practical dimension to chemical and process engineering discipline

-   Development of skills required for synthesizing knowledge already gained in other courses and elsewhere

-   Development of the habits of comprehension, asking pertinent questions and engagement in active communication

-   Appreciation of the importance of taking interest in successfully carrying out a project

-   Appreciation of the importance of innovative approaches in successfully carrying out a project

-   Development of the awareness required for self-assessing progress throughout a project

-   Development of presentation skills by active participation and feedback

-   Development of critical learning and writing skills

Course coordinator: Prof. R Shanthini (accessible at 071-5326835 and at rshanthini@pdn.ac.lk)

Evaluation panel: Dr. CS Kalpage; Ms. SMWTPK Ariyarathna; Ms. AMW Menike; Dr. DGGP Karunaratne (Moderator)

Course credits: 2 GPA credits

Pre-requisites: Prior approval of the Head of the Department for the selected project

Content

Time allocated

Problem identification and project formulation: Search for, and retrieval of, information required such as literature survey; Identification and optimum utilisation of available resources; Project execution; Cost analysis; Socio-economic and ethical evaluations of the project; Political consequences; Environmental consequences; Safety aspects; Elements of technical report writing; Communicating the results of the project study with the outside world via a report, a web-page etc.

60 project hours

TOTAL

30 eq. hours

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment Scheme:

Assessment method

Percentage marks

Self-assessment via the self-assessment record maintained by the student

Equivalent to attendance

Stage 1 assessment via presentation by the student or student group during the 4th week on the project proposal, work-plan and the literature survey. A 1000-word write up on the content of the presentation must be handed over to the course-coordinator (with copies to supervisors) on the day of the presentation. Write-up should not be copies of the presentation.

20

Stage 2 assessment via presentation by the student or student group during the 7th week on the project progress up to 7th week. Please do not repeat what has been presented during the 1st assessment. A 2000-word write up on the project progress must be handed over to the course-coordinator (with copies to supervisors) on the day of the presentation. This write-up shall include Introduction, Literature survey, Materials and Methodology Used, Results obtained so far, and Discussion of the results. Write-up should not be copies of the presentation.

30

Stage 3 assessment via presentation by the student or student group in a seminar during the 12th week on the project progress up to 12th week. A 4000-word write up on the project progress must be handed over to the course-coordinator (with copies to supervisors) on the day of the presentation. Write-up should not be copies of the presentation.

20

Stage 4 assessment of the final project report submitted during the 14th week

30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Timeline:

Week

Date

Activity

Venue

(Time)

1

30 Jan

- Project selection and discussion with potential supervisor(s)

 

- Presentation of project guidelines by the course coordinator

- Registration of selected project with the course coordinator

- Collection of the self-assessment record form from the course coordinator

(8.00 – 11.00)

 

Faculty Seminar Room

(11.00 - 12.00)

2

06 Feb

- Search for information required to carry out the project

- Literature survey

- Identification of available resources to carry out the project

 

3

13 Feb

- Discussing the project proposal, work-plan and literature survey with the project supervisor(s)

Department

(8-12)

4

20 Feb

Maha Sivarathri Day

 

5

27 Feb

 

 

- Stage 1 assessment (click for guidelines) by the Evaluation Panel of the project proposal, work-plan and the literature survey presented (click for presentation guidelines) by the student or students group.

- A 1000-word write up on the content of the presentation must be handed over to the course-coordinator (with copies to supervisors).

- Write-up should not be copies of the presentation.

Faculty

Seminar Room

(8-12)

6

05 Mar

- Project execution commenced

 

7

12 Mar

- Project execution continued

 

8

19 Mar

- Stage 2 assessment (click for guidelines) by the Evaluation Panel of the project progress presented (click for presentation guidelines) by the student or students group.

- A 2000-word write up on the project progress must be handed over to the course-coordinator (with copies to supervisors) on the day of the presentation.

- Write-up should not be copies of the presentation.

Faculty

Seminar Room

(8-12)

9

26 Mar

- Project execution continued

 

10

02 Apr

- Project execution continued

 

 

 

New Year Break

 

11

16 Apr

- Project execution continued + Final project report writing commenced

 

12

23 Apr

- Project finalization commenced + Final project report writing continued

 

13

30 Apr

- Stage 3 assessment (click for guidelines) by the Evaluation Panel of the project results presented (click for presentation guidelines) by the student or students group.

- A 4000-word write up on the project progress must be handed over to the course-coordinator (with copies to supervisors) on the day of the presentation.

- Write-up should not be copies of the presentation.

Faculty

Seminar Room

(8-12)

14

07 May

- Final project report writing finalization accommodating the feedbacks received from the supervisor(s) on the previous write-ups submitted

 

15

14 May

- Final project report (click for guidelines) submitted to the supervisor(s) for Stage 4 assessment by the Evaluation Panel

 

VERY IMPORTANT:

Any delay in adhering to the stipulated deadlines could cost the student 2.5 marks per week of delay.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Currently Executed (or Suggested) Project Topics:

Priority is given to the project ideas originating from the students themselves. Supervisors from the industry and elsewhere are encouraged provided the primary supervisor is from among the academic staff of the Department of C&P Engineering.

Natural product processes for niche market has a very great potential for development in Sri Lanka. Students are encouraged carry out projects in that area.

Web sources for project ideas: Chemical Engineering Research Bulletin

Given below is the list of project topics currently executed (and/or suggested) by the academic staff of the Department of C&P Engineering:

Project #
Project Titles and Selected Reference Sources

Project group

[Supervisors]

1

Potential use of Water Hyacinth for wastewater treatment in Sri Lanka (2-student group)

[Ms. SMWTPK Ariyaratne]

2

Ethanol production from corn stem (1 student)

[Ms. SMWTPK Ariyaratne]

3

Development of a laboratory-scale biogas unit for sustainable biogas production from the canteen waste of the Faculty of Engineering (2-student group)

Ms. Subhashini WRAI (E/08/333)

Mr. Senaratne RARC (E/08/311)

[Dr. CS Kalpage]

4

Development of a laboratory-scale oil extraction unit for citronella oil extraction from Cymbopogon (lemongrass) (2-student group)

Mr. Weerasinghe WMHD (E/08/384)

Mr. Wijerathna WDCC (E/08/394)

[Dr. CS Kalpage]

5

Laboratory-scale production of fertilizers (TSP/SSP) from Eppawala Rock Phosphate (2-student group)

Mr. Dasanayake HMDD (E/08/052)

Mr. Hereth HMSM (E/08/108)

[Dr. CS Kalpage]

 

6

Laboratory-scale biodiesel processing from waste vegetable oils collected from the restaurant and determination of properties such as calorific value, viscosity, flash point of biodiesel (2-student group)

Mr. Asantha HMR (E/08/023)

[Dr. CS Kalpage]

 

7

Modeling of tea withering process (2-student group)

Selected reference source:

Tea withering

Mr. Senanayaka Dorakumbura DKMPHB (E/07/081)

Mr. Karunathilaka NMSSB (E/07/179)

[Dr. DGGP Karunaratne]

8

Estimation of carbon footprint from Sri Lankan tourist industry (2-student group)

Selected reference source:

Ecological footprint analysis as a toll to assess tourism

[Dr. DGGP Karunaratne]

9

Fluidized bed drying characteristics of coconut (2-student group)

Selected reference source:

Coconut drying

Mr. Subasinghe NAAI (E/08/332)

Mr. Wilegoda WWMR (E/08/401)

[Dr. DGGP Karunaratne]

10

Experimental study of the downward movement of the pesticide Chlorpyrifos in soils with different organic matter content (2-student group)

Selected reference source:

Muhamad H, Al TY, Sahid I, Mat N. Downward movement of chlorpyrifos in the soil of an oil palm plantation in Sepang, Selangor, Malaysia. Journal of Oil Palm Research 2010: 22:721-728.

[Ms. AMW Menike +

Prof. R. Shanthini]

11

Experimental study of the potential of agricultural by-products in the reduction of groundwater contamination of the pesticide Chlorpyrifos by leaching through soil (2-student group)

Selected reference source:

Romyen S, Luepromchai E, Hawker D and Karnchanasest B. Potential of agricultural by-product in reducing chlorpyrifos leaching through soil. Journal of Applied Science 2007: 7(18):2686-2690.

[Ms. AMW Menike +

Prof. R. Shanthini]

12

Software development for aerobic bioreactor scale-up (2-student group; possibility of working with a computer engineering student is being explored)

Selected reference source:

Garcia-Ochoa F, Gomez E. Bioreactor scale-up and oxygen transfer rate in microbial processes: An overview. Biotechnology Advances 2009: 27: 153–176.

Mr. Jayasinghe GASK (E/08/124)

Mr. Rathnayaka MNS (E/08/274)

[Prof. R. Shanthini]

13

Exergy analysis of solar energy applications and solar power facilities (1-student)

Selected reference sources:

Saidur R, BoroumandJazi G, Mekhlif S, Jameel M. Exergy analysis of solar energy applications. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 2012: 16: 350–356.

Hepbasli A. A key review on exergetic analysis and assessment of renewable energy resources for a sustainable future. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 2008: 12: 593–661.

[Prof. R. Shanthini]

14

Is Sri Lanka moving towards or away from sustainability: an emergy analysis (2-student group)

Selected reference source:

Campbell DE, Garmestani AS. An energy systems view of sustainability: Emergy evaluation of the San Luis Basin, Colorado. Journal of Environmental Management 2012: 95: 72-97.

[Prof. R. Shanthini]

15

Emergy evaluation of a Sri Lankan thermal power plant (2-student group)

Selected reference source:

- Sha S, Hurme M. Emergy evaluation of combined heat and power plant processes. Applied Thermal Engineering 2012: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2011.11.063

- Asprion N, Rumpf B, Gritschha A. Work flow in process development for energy efficient processes. Applied Thermal Engineering 2011: 31: 2067-2072.

Mr. Dasanayaka WMKM (E/08/050)

[Prof. R. Shanthini]

16

Assessment of energy and exergy efficiencies of Sri Lankan energy sector (1-student)

Selected reference sources:

- Al-Ghandoor A, Jaber JO, Al-Hinti I. Assessment of Energy and Exergy Efficiencies of Power Generation Sub-Sector in Jordan. Jordan Journal of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 2009: 3(1): 1-8.

- Koroneos CJ, Nanaki EA, Xydis GA. Exergy analysis of the energy use in Greece. Energy Policy 2011: 39: 2475–2481.

[Prof. R. Shanthini]

17

Assessment of energy and exergy efficiencies of Sri Lankan agricultural / Industrial / Transportation sector (3-student group with a sector per student)

Selected reference sources:

- Ahamed JU, Saidur R, Masjuki HH, Mekhilef S, Ali MB, Furqon MH. An application of energy and exergy analysis in agricultural sector of Malaysia. Energy Policy 2011: 39: 7922–7929.

- Ediger VS, Camdalı U. Energy and exergy efficiencies in Turkish transportation sector, 1988–2004. Energy Policy 2007: 35: 1238–1244.

- Koroneos CJ, Nanaki EA. Energy and exergy utilization assessment of the Greek transport sector. Resources, Conservation and Recycling 2008: 52: 700–706.

- Sanaei SM, Furubayashi T, Nakata T. Assessment of energy utilization in Iran’s industrial sector using energy and exergy analysis method. Applied Thermal Engineering 2012: 36: 472-481.

 

Mr. Ariyaratne RGRNK (E/08/018)

Mr. Fernando BDN (E/08/079)

Mr. Illukwtta IAC (E/08/113)

[Prof. R. Shanthini]

18

Setting-up of an index to rate food manufacturers of small, medium (2-student group)

Selected reference sources:

Ms. Amarasekare KLLR (E/08/011)

Mr. Bandara EAPC (E/08/032)

[Prof. R. Shanthini]

19

Effect of presence of strontium on precipitation characteristic of calcium carbonate.

Selected reference sources:

Mr. Nawarathna WPGS (E/08/217)

Mr. Thilakarathna HPTC (E/08/356)

[Dr. DGGP Karunaratne]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presentation Guidelines:

Time allocation for each presentation: 10 minutes (not a minute more) per research group for presentation and 05 minutes per each student to defend the presentation.

Content of the 10-minute presentation: Student is expected to guide his/her presentation using the assessment guidelines for Stage 1 or Stage 2 or Stage 3 as appropriate. Further guidance could be obtained from the project supervisors and course coordinator (if necessary).

Presentation style: Professional guidance for improving the presentation style could be arranged upon request from the student(s) by the course coordinator on individual basis or as a workshop.

Note: All CP307 students are expected to be present during the entire assessment sessions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final Project Report Guidelines:

Submission mode: A hardcopy must be deposited in the letterbox of the primary project supervisor, AND a softcopy must be emailed to admin@rshanthini.com in *.doc or *.pdf format before the deadline.

Format of the report: Project report guidelines for paper-format (for experiment study and numerical simulation based projects) and for manual-format (for product-based projects) are uploaded. Click here for a sample paper in paper-format.

VERY IMPORTANT:

Keep in mind that word to word reproduction of material available elsewhere without crediting the source (known as plagiarism and is a serious offence) will earn you a fail grade in CP307.

 

 

 

 

email: rshanthini@pdn.ac.lk

 

copyright R. Shanthini